“Speed Enablers” of Agile

February 24, 2014

My previous posts that comprise Chapter Three were all about the business end of agile. I outlined how work is initially defined and progressively refined throughout the delivery process. I also covered how work should flow to teams along with how those teams manage that work and emergent change. And while this is a great start, there’s more to being agile.

As we look at how software teams deliver a solution, we need to examine the technical practices that are used in conjunction with an approach that supports lean and agile values and principles and the characteristics of learning organizations (these are covered in more detail in my post, What is Agile Development?). Technical practices are the second of three pillars in the House of Agile:


Figure 4-1


Plan to Adapt – Part Two

February 18, 2014

In my last post I put forth a simple idea management approach that involved an Investigating step as a means of assessing and refining ideas and concepts. What does this look like from an agile standpoint?

One of the primary needs is to obtain customer feedback as rapidly as possible, for the least amount of cost and effort. We need a tool that enables us to engage with and iterate with potential customers quickly and easily while assessing whether an opportunity is worth pursuing. One such tool is Ash Maurya’s Lean Canvas shown in Figure 3-13, which is an adaptation of Alex Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas:


Figure 3-13 The Lean Canvas

The Lean Canvas is divided into two sections: Product and Market, with Product on the left–hand side and Market on the right-hand side. You fill in the canvas by moving between the two sections:
  1. Problem: Identify and briefly describe your top three problems that your product is addressing.
  2. Customer Segments: List who the customers are, and determine if they can be further segmented. If they can, it is recommended that you create a new canvas for each segment because other elements of the canvas will likely be different for each segment.
  3. Unfair Advantage: What do you have to offer that can’t be readily copied or bought?
  4. Solution: What is the minimal feature set that will satisfy your customers in ways that they will pay for?
  5. Key Metrics: What actions will users need to take that maps to acquisition, retention and revenue?
  6. Channels: How will you reach your customers?
  7. Cost Structure: What are fixed and variable costs?
  8. Revenue Streams: How will you generate revenue?
  9. Unique Value Proposition: Based on this information, what is the product’s primary differentiator and reason that it is worth buying?